Kenny Powers knows, but does he know about hydration? 
Hydration. Your ticket to success as an athlete. Before, during and after practice/athletic events your mind should be on hydration and hydration should be on your mind, yo. Yes, climate makes a difference. Yes, type of sport (endurance versus strength) makes a difference. Still, hydration is important for all athletes.
So, you’re now thinking, crap- I better gulp a metric ton of water before, during and after practice.
False. Let’s break it down.
Before
Drinking around 2-3L at least 4 hours prior to practice will have you set preemtively, and don’t forget that snack before that keeps your guts happy (low fiber carb buddy + low-fat protein buddy, and I say buddy so don’t eat something unfamiliar to you). An example would be a banana and low-fat yogurt.
During
Carbs, fluid and electrolytes are your pals during activity, especially when the activity is over several hours. 6-to-12 ounces of fluid every 15 to 20 minutes is key. You also need carbohydrate to maintain blood glucose (energy) and depending on the type of athletics, to avoid exhausting glycogen stores (energy storage). This is why drinks like Gatorade exist. Gatorade and other sports drinks contain 6-8% carbohydrate and are generally recommended for sports lasting longer than 1 hour. Without your buddies you run the risk of heat stroke, muscle cramps, mental confusion and poor performance. 
Chances are you’re gonna sweat, and a lot (especially in hot climates), so fluid loss and electrolyte loss go hand-in-hand, sodium, potassium and chloride are super important for fluid balance. This is one reason why water is simply not enough for lengthy practices/athletic events.
There’s also such a thing as overhydration, which results in further depletion and imbalance of electrolytes can have serious complications. Hyponatremia (low serum sodium) may be evidenced by swelling of the hands, feeling light-headed and nausea, and basically results in a dilution of  the blood. Though serious complications are rare (we’ve seen it in a few marathon runners) it’s still an important consideration.
After
Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition recommends drinking 16 to 24 oz of fluid for every pound (0.5 kg) lost during exercise. Here’s the key to figuring this out: weigh yourself in the am before exercise (a few times to get an average) then after exercise to see how much you’ve lost. If you lose >2% of your body weight, it’s likely you’re dehydrated.
Electrolyte and glycogen store replenishment is still of concern as well. Having a small meal that includes carbohydrate, perhaps a salty snack, will help regenerate your balance. Lean protein is also recommended for muscle repair at least a few hours post-activity.
All this water talk makes me have to pee
In all seriousness, hydration isn’t as simple as chugging water like no one’s business. Also, sports drinks aren’t the only option. Don’t like Gatorade or Powerade? Make your own electrolyte + carbohydrate containing beverage. Add orange, lemon and lime wedges, cucumber, mint and a hint of salt to water. Like coconut water? There’s another option. Coconut water is the new hype in the hydration realm, since it contains potassium, as well as the other essential electrolytes- though not every is super stoked on the taste.
Keep up the good work, you’ve now reached level hydration expert.

Kenny Powers knows, but does he know about hydration? 

Hydration. Your ticket to success as an athlete. Before, during and after practice/athletic events your mind should be on hydration and hydration should be on your mind, yo. Yes, climate makes a difference. Yes, type of sport (endurance versus strength) makes a difference. Still, hydration is important for all athletes.

So, you’re now thinking, crap- I better gulp a metric ton of water before, during and after practice.

False. Let’s break it down.

Before

Drinking around 2-3L at least 4 hours prior to practice will have you set preemtively, and don’t forget that snack before that keeps your guts happy (low fiber carb buddy + low-fat protein buddy, and I say buddy so don’t eat something unfamiliar to you). An example would be a banana and low-fat yogurt.

During

Carbs, fluid and electrolytes are your pals during activity, especially when the activity is over several hours. 6-to-12 ounces of fluid every 15 to 20 minutes is key. You also need carbohydrate to maintain blood glucose (energy) and depending on the type of athletics, to avoid exhausting glycogen stores (energy storage). This is why drinks like Gatorade exist. Gatorade and other sports drinks contain 6-8% carbohydrate and are generally recommended for sports lasting longer than 1 hour. Without your buddies you run the risk of heat stroke, muscle cramps, mental confusion and poor performance.

Chances are you’re gonna sweat, and a lot (especially in hot climates), so fluid loss and electrolyte loss go hand-in-hand, sodium, potassium and chloride are super important for fluid balance. This is one reason why water is simply not enough for lengthy practices/athletic events.

There’s also such a thing as overhydration, which results in further depletion and imbalance of electrolytes can have serious complications. Hyponatremia (low serum sodium) may be evidenced by swelling of the hands, feeling light-headed and nausea, and basically results in a dilution of  the blood. Though serious complications are rare (we’ve seen it in a few marathon runners) it’s still an important consideration.

After

Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition recommends drinking 16 to 24 oz of fluid for every pound (0.5 kg) lost during exercise. Here’s the key to figuring this out: weigh yourself in the am before exercise (a few times to get an average) then after exercise to see how much you’ve lost. If you lose >2% of your body weight, it’s likely you’re dehydrated.

Electrolyte and glycogen store replenishment is still of concern as well. Having a small meal that includes carbohydrate, perhaps a salty snack, will help regenerate your balance. Lean protein is also recommended for muscle repair at least a few hours post-activity.

All this water talk makes me have to pee

In all seriousness, hydration isn’t as simple as chugging water like no one’s business. Also, sports drinks aren’t the only option. Don’t like Gatorade or Powerade? Make your own electrolyte + carbohydrate containing beverage. Add orange, lemon and lime wedges, cucumber, mint and a hint of salt to water. Like coconut water? There’s another option. Coconut water is the new hype in the hydration realm, since it contains potassium, as well as the other essential electrolytes- though not every is super stoked on the taste.

Keep up the good work, you’ve now reached level hydration expert.

Step your waffle game up.
No need for the standard waffle recipe of yesteryear. Here’s a few ways you can up your waffle game by keeping it interesting and upping the nutritional quality. 
Pump up the fiber
Add 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed to 2 tablespoons water or 1 tablespoon chia seed with 2 tablespoons water to increase the fiber content of your batter. Not only will this lengthen the satiety you feel from your waffle, but you’re keeping those guts healthy. Not to mention both seeds are a source of those essential, omega-3 fatty acids. You don’t need to omit the egg in your batter, unless of course you choose to make it vegan.
Zest it up
Orange, lemon or lime zest add a punch of flavor to that ordinary waffle batter. Just a 1/2 teaspoon of zest goes a long way. Plus, there’s some powerful antioxidants and vitamin C packed in that rind.
Experiment with different grains/flour choices
Coconut, quinoa, oat, sorghum, millet, buckwheat, garbanzo bean flour, oh my! The options are endless. Oat flour will give you a heartier texture, while sorghum is sweeter. When using non-wheat flour sources, I find the waffle comes out just as lovely as long as baking powder or baking soda is included.
Oil is grand, but try these out
Yogurt, unsweetened applesauce, apple butter, pumpkin, avocado- these are all incredibly useful for swapping out that oil.
Creative additions to the batter
-Add goat cheese and chives, not only as a topping!
-Add fresh fruit to the batter, or even frozen fresh fruit
-Add juice from fresh fruits, such as pineapple, orange, etc.
-Pumpkin puree- it’s not just for thanksgiving, friends!
-Lemon and poppyseed
-Sesame seed, pistachio, honey
-Date, walnut and orange
-Macadamia nut, pineapple, shredded coconut
The combinations are endless. You can throw just about anything in a waffle, so be creative and you’ll never tire of waffles.

Step your waffle game up.

No need for the standard waffle recipe of yesteryear. Here’s a few ways you can up your waffle game by keeping it interesting and upping the nutritional quality.

Pump up the fiber

Add 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed to 2 tablespoons water or 1 tablespoon chia seed with 2 tablespoons water to increase the fiber content of your batter. Not only will this lengthen the satiety you feel from your waffle, but you’re keeping those guts healthy. Not to mention both seeds are a source of those essential, omega-3 fatty acids. You don’t need to omit the egg in your batter, unless of course you choose to make it vegan.

Zest it up

Orange, lemon or lime zest add a punch of flavor to that ordinary waffle batter. Just a 1/2 teaspoon of zest goes a long way. Plus, there’s some powerful antioxidants and vitamin C packed in that rind.

Experiment with different grains/flour choices

Coconut, quinoa, oat, sorghum, millet, buckwheat, garbanzo bean flour, oh my! The options are endless. Oat flour will give you a heartier texture, while sorghum is sweeter. When using non-wheat flour sources, I find the waffle comes out just as lovely as long as baking powder or baking soda is included.

Oil is grand, but try these out

Yogurt, unsweetened applesauce, apple butter, pumpkin, avocado- these are all incredibly useful for swapping out that oil.

Creative additions to the batter

-Add goat cheese and chives, not only as a topping!

-Add fresh fruit to the batter, or even frozen fresh fruit

-Add juice from fresh fruits, such as pineapple, orange, etc.

-Pumpkin puree- it’s not just for thanksgiving, friends!

-Lemon and poppyseed

-Sesame seed, pistachio, honey

-Date, walnut and orange

-Macadamia nut, pineapple, shredded coconut

The combinations are endless. You can throw just about anything in a waffle, so be creative and you’ll never tire of waffles.

Day 100: Mango + blueberry oatmeal, with triple the seed power (hemp, chia, sunflower) and Greek yogurt. We made it, day 100. 

Now that this challenge is up I’ll be going back to the normal activity of eating all my food before it’s cold. Also now non-breakfast recipes get posted. Boom.

Day 100: Mango + blueberry oatmeal, with triple the seed power (hemp, chia, sunflower) and Greek yogurt. We made it, day 100.

Now that this challenge is up I’ll be going back to the normal activity of eating all my food before it’s cold. Also now non-breakfast recipes get posted. Boom.

Day 99: With two days left, and cherries still in my fridge, I bring you cherry french toast with goat cheese.

Day 98: Double chocolate gluten free muffins. Didn’t have time this morning, made these in the evening.

Day 98: Double chocolate gluten free muffins. Didn’t have time this morning, made these in the evening.

Day 97: Coconut and pineapple waffle with grilled pineapple and blueberry topping.

Day 97: Coconut and pineapple waffle with grilled pineapple and blueberry topping.

Day 96: Rolled oats, strawberry, blueberry, chia, hemp seeds, toasted pecans, walnuts, almond medley with toasted coconut shreds. Greek yogurt mixed in as well. Just an ordinary morning.

Day 96: Rolled oats, strawberry, blueberry, chia, hemp seeds, toasted pecans, walnuts, almond medley with toasted coconut shreds. Greek yogurt mixed in as well. Just an ordinary morning.

Day 95: Fresh cherry waffle with goat cheese and cherry topping.

Day 95: Fresh cherry waffle with goat cheese and cherry topping.

Day 94: oats, peaches, blueberries, Greek yogurt, hemp and chia.

Day 94: oats, peaches, blueberries, Greek yogurt, hemp and chia.

Day 93: Spinach, parmesan omelet with quinoa, strawberries, chia and coconut cream.

Day 93: Spinach, parmesan omelet with quinoa, strawberries, chia and coconut cream.