Mushroom, grilled onion, garlic and parsley brown rice. Uncle Ben who?

Mushroom, grilled onion, garlic and parsley brown rice. Uncle Ben who?

Sometimes you just want apple pie filling, without all the cornstarch and added sugar.
Here’s the recipe: 6 apples (I used Gala apples) cubed; 3 tablespoons coconut oil, extra virgin, room temperature (I probably could have used one less tablespoon; substituting butter or margarine would also work nicely); 1/2 cup water (or apple cider, but you’d be adding sugar then); 8 prunes/dates, chopped; juice from 1/2 of a medium lemon; 1 tablespoon vanilla extract.
As far as spices go, I eye-balled this part. I used a generous amount of cinnamon, then went lighter on ground ginger, cardamom, cloves and nutmeg. If you have pumpkin pie spice, this would also work the same. I just looked for a good coating of the apples and considered that to be enough.
Mix everything but the water in a bowl so that the apples are properly coated. Then, transfer to a lightly oiled slow cooker (or use liner if you have that). Pour in the water, and set on low for about 1.5 hours. If after that time period the apples aren’t slightly tender, cook for another 15 mins. Then turn off slow cooker, and let sit for an hour. The apples should still be hot and not overly cooked.
Enjoy on pancakes or French toast the next morning. Also enjoyable on yogurt, or just alone as a snack. Add nuts of choice for some protein.
Nutrition information per serving (6 servings): 194 kcal, 33g CHO, 7g Fiber.

Sometimes you just want apple pie filling, without all the cornstarch and added sugar.

Here’s the recipe: 6 apples (I used Gala apples) cubed; 3 tablespoons coconut oil, extra virgin, room temperature (I probably could have used one less tablespoon; substituting butter or margarine would also work nicely); 1/2 cup water (or apple cider, but you’d be adding sugar then); 8 prunes/dates, chopped; juice from 1/2 of a medium lemon; 1 tablespoon vanilla extract.

As far as spices go, I eye-balled this part. I used a generous amount of cinnamon, then went lighter on ground ginger, cardamom, cloves and nutmeg. If you have pumpkin pie spice, this would also work the same. I just looked for a good coating of the apples and considered that to be enough.

Mix everything but the water in a bowl so that the apples are properly coated. Then, transfer to a lightly oiled slow cooker (or use liner if you have that). Pour in the water, and set on low for about 1.5 hours. If after that time period the apples aren’t slightly tender, cook for another 15 mins. Then turn off slow cooker, and let sit for an hour. The apples should still be hot and not overly cooked.

Enjoy on pancakes or French toast the next morning. Also enjoyable on yogurt, or just alone as a snack. Add nuts of choice for some protein.

Nutrition information per serving (6 servings): 194 kcal, 33g CHO, 7g Fiber.

Quinoa chocolate chip muffins. Added Chobani cherry yogurt for some cherry flavor. This is what happens when you have a big amount of cooked quinoa in your fridge.

1 cup cooked Quinoa; 2 cups gluten free all purpose flour, 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder; 1/2 Chobani cherry container (about 1/4 cup yogurt); 1/2 cup sugar substitute of choice; 1 egg; 2 tablespoons cinnamon; 3/4 cup unsweetened almond milk (or milk of choice); 1 teaspoon vanilla; 1/3 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (you could add more, but it will alter the nutrition information).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. You will need oiled muffin tins.

Mix all the wet ingredients, then mix in the dry and the chocolate chips last. Scoop (I used an ice cream scooper) into the muffin tins and pat down to form the muffins. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until muffins are lightly brown.

Nutrition facts (serves 12): 219kcal, 40g CHO, 5g fiber, 7g protein.

Don’t know what to do with leftovers? I got this. 

Plantains from an El Salvadorian spot in Berkeley appropriately called Platano drenched with a delicious probiotic yogurt-based beverage also known as Kefir. Also mixed in are fresh blueberries topped with ground cinnamon.

Don’t know what to do with leftovers? I got this.

Plantains from an El Salvadorian spot in Berkeley appropriately called Platano drenched with a delicious probiotic yogurt-based beverage also known as Kefir. Also mixed in are fresh blueberries topped with ground cinnamon.

On-the-go bar recipe- move over Larabar.  1/2 cup almonds 1/4 cup walnuts 1/4 cup hemp hearts 1 cup medjool dates, pitted and packed 1/4 cup finely shredded coconut 2 tablespoons of crystallized ginger, finely chopped 1 tablespoon coconut oil 
Place nuts in food processor until finely chopped (too long and you get but butter). Add dates and remainder of ingredients, process until a paste forms. In a parchment paper lined dish, lay out “paste” flat and place in the refrigerator for an hour or so. You can cut the bars after the hour is up. Be sure to store the finished bars in the fridge.
Alternative ingredient ideas: add shredded carrots, other types of dried fruits, apple, lime zest, etc.

On-the-go bar recipe- move over Larabar.
1/2 cup almonds
1/4 cup walnuts
1/4 cup hemp hearts
1 cup medjool dates, pitted and packed
1/4 cup finely shredded coconut
2 tablespoons of crystallized ginger, finely chopped
1 tablespoon coconut oil

Place nuts in food processor until finely chopped (too long and you get but butter). Add dates and remainder of ingredients, process until a paste forms. In a parchment paper lined dish, lay out “paste” flat and place in the refrigerator for an hour or so. You can cut the bars after the hour is up. Be sure to store the finished bars in the fridge.

Alternative ingredient ideas: add shredded carrots, other types of dried fruits, apple, lime zest, etc.

Zucchini, scallion and mushroom pancakes, Sriracha drizzle. Veggies for breakfast, yes please.
1 zucchini, shredded; 2 eggs, beaten; 1 flax egg (1 tablespoon ground flaxseed + 2 tablespoons water); 1 green onion, chopped; 1.5 cups spinach, chopped; 3 T flour of choice (in this case I used coconut flour); 1 tablespoon coconut milk; 1 teaspoon garlic powder; 1 teaspoon herb or herb mix of choice, I used Zaatar (herbs de provedence, basil; italian seasoning would also work nicely); 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper; a pinch of salt; and of course the Sriracha drizzle on top. You can add more vegetables to this as well, some suggestions; small diced red pepper, shredded carrots, chopped kale, green chillies, etc.
You basically beat your eggs, chop your veggies, mix them all up together and with a hot frying pan (I used safflower oil for cooking) brown them on both sides. Plate, and pour on the hot sauce.

Zucchini, scallion and mushroom pancakes, Sriracha drizzle. Veggies for breakfast, yes please.

1 zucchini, shredded; 2 eggs, beaten; 1 flax egg (1 tablespoon ground flaxseed + 2 tablespoons water); 1 green onion, chopped; 1.5 cups spinach, chopped; 3 T flour of choice (in this case I used coconut flour); 1 tablespoon coconut milk; 1 teaspoon garlic powder; 1 teaspoon herb or herb mix of choice, I used Zaatar (herbs de provedence, basil; italian seasoning would also work nicely); 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper; a pinch of salt; and of course the Sriracha drizzle on top. You can add more vegetables to this as well, some suggestions; small diced red pepper, shredded carrots, chopped kale, green chillies, etc.

You basically beat your eggs, chop your veggies, mix them all up together and with a hot frying pan (I used safflower oil for cooking) brown them on both sides. Plate, and pour on the hot sauce.

Philosoraptor brings up a good question; however, none of the smoothies mentioned below will involve ketchup.
Smoothies: keep it interesting, keep it refreshing. 
For a while now I thought about posting some of my recurrent smoothie jams on here, well, now that I’ve been asked by a friend to do so, it’s all happening. So, here are a few that are committed to memory:
1. It’s all coming up blueberries
1 cup fresh (or frozen, no added sugar) blueberries; 1 tablespoon chia seed (or flaxseed, ground if chia isn’t your thing); 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder (I prefer Sprout’s store brand; Vega or Sunwarrior are also good); 1 medium banana, works best if frozen ahead of time; 3/4 cup frozen spinach or other green of choice; 1 tsp cinnamon (optional); 3/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk (or other milk of choice).
2. Peaches and cream, but green
1 large yellow peach, sliced, pitted; 1 tablespoon flaxseed, ground, or chia seed; 1/2 cup vanilla or plain yogurt (depends on your palate); 1/2 banana; 3/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk or soy, or other milk of choice; 1 cup chopped kale.
3. Cherries and chocolate, it’s like dessert
1 cup fresh-frozen, pitted cherries (unsweetened); 1-2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder; 2-3 pitted dates; 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder; 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed; 3/4 cup unsweetened, vanilla soymilk.
4. Tropical - island style 
1/2 cup mango (fresh or frozen, but no sugar added); 1/2 cup pineapple (again, fresh or frozen); or use 1 cup frozen, tropical mix, no sugar added; 2 tablespoons unsweetened, shredded coconut (optional); 2-3 dates, pitted; 1/2 cup plain yogurt (flavored is good, but adds refined sugar); 3/4 cup light coconut milk; 1 tablespoon chia seed. Note: coconut water may be delicious with this combination, though I have yet to try that.
5. Pumpkin, the underrated squash.
1 cup pumpkin puree, fresh or canned; 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed; 1 tsp vanilla extract; 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder; 1 tsp allspice, pumpkin pie spice, or just cinnamon; 1 medium banana; 3/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk (or other milk of choice).
6. Berries, berries and more berries
1 cup of the mixed berry medley (I prefer Costco’s frozen mix, it has raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and strawberries); 1 tablespoon chia seed; 1/2 cup vanilla or pain yogurt; 1 cup frozen kale/spinach; 1 medium banana.
7. The nutty buddy - Sunflower seed butter and chocolate party
2 Tablespoons sunflower seed butter (or peanut, almond, hazelnut, etc); 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder; 2 bananas; 1/2 avocado; 2 dates, pitted; 3/4 cup light coconut milk (you could sub another milk, but coconut tends to be richer; 1 tsp vanilla extract; 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed.
That’s all for now, folks.
I have a few more recipes to dig up, but these are the basic smoothie combinations that I rotate on the regular.
A few side notes: 1. I typically enjoy plain, Greek yogurt. It’s higher in protein than regular yogurt, plain also does not have added sugar. 2. Add ice to make your smoothie thicker, add more liquid to make it thinner. I like mine thicker in texture, so I generally use less liquid. You can also use water if you prefer to do so. 3. Flax and chia contain healthy fats, and are amazing fiber sources, so either one is totally worth adding. Both will also add thickness to your smoothie. 4. Frozen fruit should always be purchased no sugar added. Whey the heck would you need to sweeten what is already sweet? Plus if you add dates, like some of these recipes do, you will generally find the sweetness level satisfying.
Final aside- Whole foods are your friends. We don’t juice our friends, totally unnecessary and tragic waste of fiber. That is your PSA for the evening.

Philosoraptor brings up a good question; however, none of the smoothies mentioned below will involve ketchup.

Smoothies: keep it interesting, keep it refreshing.

For a while now I thought about posting some of my recurrent smoothie jams on here, well, now that I’ve been asked by a friend to do so, it’s all happening. So, here are a few that are committed to memory:

1. It’s all coming up blueberries

1 cup fresh (or frozen, no added sugar) blueberries; 1 tablespoon chia seed (or flaxseed, ground if chia isn’t your thing); 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder (I prefer Sprout’s store brand; Vega or Sunwarrior are also good); 1 medium banana, works best if frozen ahead of time; 3/4 cup frozen spinach or other green of choice; 1 tsp cinnamon (optional); 3/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk (or other milk of choice).

2. Peaches and cream, but green

1 large yellow peach, sliced, pitted; 1 tablespoon flaxseed, ground, or chia seed; 1/2 cup vanilla or plain yogurt (depends on your palate); 1/2 banana; 3/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk or soy, or other milk of choice; 1 cup chopped kale.

3. Cherries and chocolate, it’s like dessert

1 cup fresh-frozen, pitted cherries (unsweetened); 1-2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder; 2-3 pitted dates; 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder; 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed; 3/4 cup unsweetened, vanilla soymilk.

4. Tropical - island style

1/2 cup mango (fresh or frozen, but no sugar added); 1/2 cup pineapple (again, fresh or frozen); or use 1 cup frozen, tropical mix, no sugar added; 2 tablespoons unsweetened, shredded coconut (optional); 2-3 dates, pitted; 1/2 cup plain yogurt (flavored is good, but adds refined sugar); 3/4 cup light coconut milk; 1 tablespoon chia seed. Note: coconut water may be delicious with this combination, though I have yet to try that.

5. Pumpkin, the underrated squash.

1 cup pumpkin puree, fresh or canned; 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed; 1 tsp vanilla extract; 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder; 1 tsp allspice, pumpkin pie spice, or just cinnamon; 1 medium banana; 3/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk (or other milk of choice).

6. Berries, berries and more berries

1 cup of the mixed berry medley (I prefer Costco’s frozen mix, it has raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and strawberries); 1 tablespoon chia seed; 1/2 cup vanilla or pain yogurt; 1 cup frozen kale/spinach; 1 medium banana.

7. The nutty buddy - Sunflower seed butter and chocolate party

2 Tablespoons sunflower seed butter (or peanut, almond, hazelnut, etc); 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder; 2 bananas; 1/2 avocado; 2 dates, pitted; 3/4 cup light coconut milk (you could sub another milk, but coconut tends to be richer; 1 tsp vanilla extract; 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed.

That’s all for now, folks.

I have a few more recipes to dig up, but these are the basic smoothie combinations that I rotate on the regular.

A few side notes: 1. I typically enjoy plain, Greek yogurt. It’s higher in protein than regular yogurt, plain also does not have added sugar. 2. Add ice to make your smoothie thicker, add more liquid to make it thinner. I like mine thicker in texture, so I generally use less liquid. You can also use water if you prefer to do so. 3. Flax and chia contain healthy fats, and are amazing fiber sources, so either one is totally worth adding. Both will also add thickness to your smoothie. 4. Frozen fruit should always be purchased no sugar added. Whey the heck would you need to sweeten what is already sweet? Plus if you add dates, like some of these recipes do, you will generally find the sweetness level satisfying.

Final aside- Whole foods are your friends. We don’t juice our friends, totally unnecessary and tragic waste of fiber. That is your PSA for the evening.

Peach crisp with fresh sliced yellow peaches, oats, quinoa, coconut oil, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger and brown sugar. For family dinner.

Here’s what I used in the crumble topping:

1.5 cups cooked quinoa; 1 cup all purpose, gluten free flour; 1 cup rolled oats; 3/4 cup coconut oil; 1 tablespoon honey; 1/2 tablespoon cinnamon; 1 tsp cardamom, ginger; 1/4 cup brown sugar; scant amount of salt.

Filling:

About 8-10 yellow peaches, sliced; liberal amounts of cinnamon, cardamom, ginger; 2 tablespoons of brown sugar; 1 tsp lemon juice; 1 tablespoon honey.

Set the oven at 425F. Toss the crumble in a bowl until the topping bunches up. In a separate bowl, toss the peach mixture and then spread into a baking sheet. Top the peaches with the crumble. Place crumble in the oven for about 20-30 minutes; check at 20 mins for a crunchy crust.

Let crumble cool for a bit before eating, or you may have zero functional taste buds after.

Kenny Powers knows, but does he know about hydration? 
Hydration. Your ticket to success as an athlete. Before, during and after practice/athletic events your mind should be on hydration and hydration should be on your mind, yo. Yes, climate makes a difference. Yes, type of sport (endurance versus strength) makes a difference. Still, hydration is important for all athletes.
So, you’re now thinking, crap- I better gulp a metric ton of water before, during and after practice.
False. Let’s break it down.
Before
Drinking around 2-3L at least 4 hours prior to practice will have you set preemtively, and don’t forget that snack before that keeps your guts happy (low fiber carb buddy + low-fat protein buddy, and I say buddy so don’t eat something unfamiliar to you). An example would be a banana and low-fat yogurt.
During
Carbs, fluid and electrolytes are your pals during activity, especially when the activity is over several hours. 6-to-12 ounces of fluid every 15 to 20 minutes is key. You also need carbohydrate to maintain blood glucose (energy) and depending on the type of athletics, to avoid exhausting glycogen stores (energy storage). This is why drinks like Gatorade exist. Gatorade and other sports drinks contain 6-8% carbohydrate and are generally recommended for sports lasting longer than 1 hour. Without your buddies you run the risk of heat stroke, muscle cramps, mental confusion and poor performance. 
Chances are you’re gonna sweat, and a lot (especially in hot climates), so fluid loss and electrolyte loss go hand-in-hand, sodium, potassium and chloride are super important for fluid balance. This is one reason why water is simply not enough for lengthy practices/athletic events.
There’s also such a thing as overhydration, which results in further depletion and imbalance of electrolytes can have serious complications. Hyponatremia (low serum sodium) may be evidenced by swelling of the hands, feeling light-headed and nausea, and basically results in a dilution of  the blood. Though serious complications are rare (we’ve seen it in a few marathon runners) it’s still an important consideration.
After
Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition recommends drinking 16 to 24 oz of fluid for every pound (0.5 kg) lost during exercise. Here’s the key to figuring this out: weigh yourself in the am before exercise (a few times to get an average) then after exercise to see how much you’ve lost. If you lose >2% of your body weight, it’s likely you’re dehydrated.
Electrolyte and glycogen store replenishment is still of concern as well. Having a small meal that includes carbohydrate, perhaps a salty snack, will help regenerate your balance. Lean protein is also recommended for muscle repair at least a few hours post-activity.
All this water talk makes me have to pee
In all seriousness, hydration isn’t as simple as chugging water like no one’s business. Also, sports drinks aren’t the only option. Don’t like Gatorade or Powerade? Make your own electrolyte + carbohydrate containing beverage. Add orange, lemon and lime wedges, cucumber, mint and a hint of salt to water. Like coconut water? There’s another option. Coconut water is the new hype in the hydration realm, since it contains potassium, as well as the other essential electrolytes- though not every is super stoked on the taste.
Keep up the good work, you’ve now reached level hydration expert.

Kenny Powers knows, but does he know about hydration? 

Hydration. Your ticket to success as an athlete. Before, during and after practice/athletic events your mind should be on hydration and hydration should be on your mind, yo. Yes, climate makes a difference. Yes, type of sport (endurance versus strength) makes a difference. Still, hydration is important for all athletes.

So, you’re now thinking, crap- I better gulp a metric ton of water before, during and after practice.

False. Let’s break it down.

Before

Drinking around 2-3L at least 4 hours prior to practice will have you set preemtively, and don’t forget that snack before that keeps your guts happy (low fiber carb buddy + low-fat protein buddy, and I say buddy so don’t eat something unfamiliar to you). An example would be a banana and low-fat yogurt.

During

Carbs, fluid and electrolytes are your pals during activity, especially when the activity is over several hours. 6-to-12 ounces of fluid every 15 to 20 minutes is key. You also need carbohydrate to maintain blood glucose (energy) and depending on the type of athletics, to avoid exhausting glycogen stores (energy storage). This is why drinks like Gatorade exist. Gatorade and other sports drinks contain 6-8% carbohydrate and are generally recommended for sports lasting longer than 1 hour. Without your buddies you run the risk of heat stroke, muscle cramps, mental confusion and poor performance.

Chances are you’re gonna sweat, and a lot (especially in hot climates), so fluid loss and electrolyte loss go hand-in-hand, sodium, potassium and chloride are super important for fluid balance. This is one reason why water is simply not enough for lengthy practices/athletic events.

There’s also such a thing as overhydration, which results in further depletion and imbalance of electrolytes can have serious complications. Hyponatremia (low serum sodium) may be evidenced by swelling of the hands, feeling light-headed and nausea, and basically results in a dilution of  the blood. Though serious complications are rare (we’ve seen it in a few marathon runners) it’s still an important consideration.

After

Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition recommends drinking 16 to 24 oz of fluid for every pound (0.5 kg) lost during exercise. Here’s the key to figuring this out: weigh yourself in the am before exercise (a few times to get an average) then after exercise to see how much you’ve lost. If you lose >2% of your body weight, it’s likely you’re dehydrated.

Electrolyte and glycogen store replenishment is still of concern as well. Having a small meal that includes carbohydrate, perhaps a salty snack, will help regenerate your balance. Lean protein is also recommended for muscle repair at least a few hours post-activity.

All this water talk makes me have to pee

In all seriousness, hydration isn’t as simple as chugging water like no one’s business. Also, sports drinks aren’t the only option. Don’t like Gatorade or Powerade? Make your own electrolyte + carbohydrate containing beverage. Add orange, lemon and lime wedges, cucumber, mint and a hint of salt to water. Like coconut water? There’s another option. Coconut water is the new hype in the hydration realm, since it contains potassium, as well as the other essential electrolytes- though not every is super stoked on the taste.

Keep up the good work, you’ve now reached level hydration expert.

Step your waffle game up.
No need for the standard waffle recipe of yesteryear. Here’s a few ways you can up your waffle game by keeping it interesting and upping the nutritional quality. 
Pump up the fiber
Add 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed to 2 tablespoons water or 1 tablespoon chia seed with 2 tablespoons water to increase the fiber content of your batter. Not only will this lengthen the satiety you feel from your waffle, but you’re keeping those guts healthy. Not to mention both seeds are a source of those essential, omega-3 fatty acids. You don’t need to omit the egg in your batter, unless of course you choose to make it vegan.
Zest it up
Orange, lemon or lime zest add a punch of flavor to that ordinary waffle batter. Just a 1/2 teaspoon of zest goes a long way. Plus, there’s some powerful antioxidants and vitamin C packed in that rind.
Experiment with different grains/flour choices
Coconut, quinoa, oat, sorghum, millet, buckwheat, garbanzo bean flour, oh my! The options are endless. Oat flour will give you a heartier texture, while sorghum is sweeter. When using non-wheat flour sources, I find the waffle comes out just as lovely as long as baking powder or baking soda is included.
Oil is grand, but try these out
Yogurt, unsweetened applesauce, apple butter, pumpkin, avocado- these are all incredibly useful for swapping out that oil.
Creative additions to the batter
-Add goat cheese and chives, not only as a topping!
-Add fresh fruit to the batter, or even frozen fresh fruit
-Add juice from fresh fruits, such as pineapple, orange, etc.
-Pumpkin puree- it’s not just for thanksgiving, friends!
-Lemon and poppyseed
-Sesame seed, pistachio, honey
-Date, walnut and orange
-Macadamia nut, pineapple, shredded coconut
The combinations are endless. You can throw just about anything in a waffle, so be creative and you’ll never tire of waffles.

Step your waffle game up.

No need for the standard waffle recipe of yesteryear. Here’s a few ways you can up your waffle game by keeping it interesting and upping the nutritional quality.

Pump up the fiber

Add 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed to 2 tablespoons water or 1 tablespoon chia seed with 2 tablespoons water to increase the fiber content of your batter. Not only will this lengthen the satiety you feel from your waffle, but you’re keeping those guts healthy. Not to mention both seeds are a source of those essential, omega-3 fatty acids. You don’t need to omit the egg in your batter, unless of course you choose to make it vegan.

Zest it up

Orange, lemon or lime zest add a punch of flavor to that ordinary waffle batter. Just a 1/2 teaspoon of zest goes a long way. Plus, there’s some powerful antioxidants and vitamin C packed in that rind.

Experiment with different grains/flour choices

Coconut, quinoa, oat, sorghum, millet, buckwheat, garbanzo bean flour, oh my! The options are endless. Oat flour will give you a heartier texture, while sorghum is sweeter. When using non-wheat flour sources, I find the waffle comes out just as lovely as long as baking powder or baking soda is included.

Oil is grand, but try these out

Yogurt, unsweetened applesauce, apple butter, pumpkin, avocado- these are all incredibly useful for swapping out that oil.

Creative additions to the batter

-Add goat cheese and chives, not only as a topping!

-Add fresh fruit to the batter, or even frozen fresh fruit

-Add juice from fresh fruits, such as pineapple, orange, etc.

-Pumpkin puree- it’s not just for thanksgiving, friends!

-Lemon and poppyseed

-Sesame seed, pistachio, honey

-Date, walnut and orange

-Macadamia nut, pineapple, shredded coconut

The combinations are endless. You can throw just about anything in a waffle, so be creative and you’ll never tire of waffles.